Gender Stories

Captain Marvel: a teen perspective

March 13, 2019 Season 2 Episode 15
Gender Stories
Captain Marvel: a teen perspective
Chapters
Gender Stories
Captain Marvel: a teen perspective
Mar 13, 2019 Season 2 Episode 15
Alex Iantaffi
Melissa Iantaffi-Wright discusses Captain Marvel, what she means to her as a 15 years old white cis girl, being a girl in fandom, and why representation matters.
Show Notes Transcript

Alex Iantaffi talks about Captain Marvel, why representation matters and what it means to be a girl in superhero fandom with their 15 years old daughter, Melissa Iantaffi-Wright, who is a huge Marvel fan. 

Singer:
0:03
There's a whole lot of things I want to tell you about. Adventures dangerous and queer. Some you can guess and some I've only hinted at, so please lend me your ear.
Narrator:
0:32
Everyone has a relationship with gender. What's your story? Hello and welcome to Gender Stories with your host, Dr Alex Iantaffi.
Alex:
0:44
Hello and welcome to another episode of gender stories with your host Alex Iantaffi. I know, I will say I'm excited, but today I'm extra excited because for this episode I'm gonna be interviewing my teenager Melissa Iantaffi-Wright for the first time on this podcast. However...
Melissa:
1:02
You have heard my voice before.
Alex:
1:05
Melissa is the voice that introduces me because she can actually say my name correctly. And so we figured she was the best person to record my intro. But today we are talking about Captain Marvel because Melissa is not only an amazing 15 year old and a wonderful 10th grader. She is also a huge Marvel fan, right?
Melissa:
1:27
Yeah.
Alex:
1:29
So Melissa, um, what's it like to be a girl who is really, is a fan and who is in the fandom and is a huge Marvel fan?
Melissa:
1:39
Well as like there's, nowadays there's a lot more, like there's like the women of Marvel podcast and they recently, um, started a new cartoon, the, um, Marvel Rising that has a lot more like female characters in a lot of the new comic books have like new female characters and new POC characters. And um, so it's kind of cool to be a girl and a Marvel fan in this time where there's like starting to be a lot more like women and girls in Marvel and more visibly the main characters in Marvel. But like in the movies it's happening a lot slower than like, um, like the other things I said, like the podcasts and the comics and shows.
Alex:
2:38
What are, you mentioned the Women of Marvel podcast, which is great. What are some of the comics and the TV shows that you think have better kind of, um, women and POC representation as you mentioned?
Melissa:
2:52
Um, well there's for TV shows, there's The Runaways, which is the, like a cast of teens and there's a lot of POC and female characters in it and queer characters as well. And um in The Gifted, there's a lot of POC and there's quite a few strong female characters as well. And in Agents of Shield is actually like, it's one of their older shows that has like a very diverse cast. And in the comics, there's like the Ms Marvel, which relates to Captain Marvel. Um, and there's um, America Chavez and um, there's the new Hawkeye Kate Bishop and um, Rere Williams the Iron Heart. And so a lot of the older characters are also kind of being reinvented with a more like diverse cast as well.
Alex:
3:56
That's right. And isn't Shuri Black Panther now as well in the comic books?
Melissa:
4:01
Um, well there's a couple of comics where she is Black Panther. Okay. She's not, she didn't become Black Panther, but there are like, I own one of the graphic novels where she is the Black Panther.
Alex:
4:15
This is where your superior knowledge of Marvel will totally show and my ignorance will just be hanging out to dry in this podcast, but I'm okay with that. So let's talk a little bit, um, about Captain Marvel particularly. Um, I'm a little late recording this episode, I should have recorded it a week ago but I wasn't very well. But this gives us the opportunity to talk about this movie that you were incredibly excited about. I mean, you get excited about every Marvel movie, uh, and especially Avengers. But this one at particular, meaning I feel for you, you were incredibly excited every time the trailer came on and you were really looking forward to it. We went to see it at the, you know, as soon as it was available in the theater at the fan premier we were there. Uh, why was this particular movie Captain Marvel's so important to you?
Melissa:
5:04
Um because it's the first Marvel movie where the main character is female. And, um, you know, like we had Ant Man and the Wasp where it was the first Marvel movie that had like a female in the title, but she still wasn't the main character. And she was kind of coming in late as well because there had already been Ant Man and you know, we had Shuri and Okoye and Scarlet Witch and Black Widow, but it was a Black Panther there,
Alex:
5:41
I almost thought are you gonna forget Black Widow? You have a whole wall of Black Widow fan art. [both laugh]
Melissa:
5:46
But all of those characters kind of came in. They were all kind of carried into the Marvel, the MCU [Marvel Cinematic Universe], like by these men that were already in it or that were also being introduced at the same time. And you know, they never took the spotlight. Like even Scarlet Witch who was twins with Quicksilver. And like, there were like of kind of like equal power, like, you know, he like kind of took the spotlight by dying, you know, although it caused a really cool scene for her, so yeah. But, um, whereas Captain Marvel, she kind of stands alone and she comes into it on her own and she's not like a love interest. She's not like a sister or a daughter or a mother or something. She's just a hero. And there's also like, um, her friend and her friend's daughter who like are also female characters that aren't really attached to any men and it's kind of like refreshing and different to see.
Alex:
6:55
And we will not spoiler it but not only is it refreshing to see. I don't think it would be spoilering to say that Captain Marvel is set before the other Avenger movies.
Melissa:
7:07
It's literally in the trailer people. It's set in the 90s
Alex:
7:11
It's set in the 90s.
Melissa:
7:12
That's very obviously shown. They show a blockbuster in the trailer to show it's set in the 90s.
Alex:
7:18
I didn't spoiler it. okay.
Melissa:
7:21
You know, people have like, my friends kind of forgot that and I was like how like it's, it's set before that. Like they, they very made that very obvious.
Alex:
7:29
Yes, they do make it very obvious. Even for the music, which I was very much enjoying it. Um, given that I was kind of in my late teens, early adulthood in the 90s. Um, but yes, thank you for explaining it clearly to me that I wasn't spoilering anything cause I wouldn't want to do that. Um, so you've already started to talk about this in some way this movie is really important and iconic when it comes to gender superheroes and fandom. Right? Because of all those reasons that you were talking about. Yeah. Any more that you'd want to say about kind of this intersection of kind of gender and fandom and all, you said a little bit about what's it like to be a girl, it's a good time to be a girl fan, but are there things that are maybe maybe a little bit challenging sometimes about being a girl and being into fandom specially Superhero fandom?
Melissa:
8:19
Yeah, the um, um, thing is like, um, like cosplayer like Halloween costumes that like if I go as Scarlet Witch or Black Widow, if I go to like a ComicCon, I'll be like recognized and stuff because they're all fans. But if I just go like on Halloween and dress up as, um, Black Widow, no one really knows who I am or like,
Alex:
8:53
And we know that because that actually happened.
Melissa:
8:55
Yeah. I went as Black Widow one year and no one know knew who I was.
Alex:
9:00
No, you had an amazing cosplay costume, but got admired at ComicCon.
Melissa:
9:05
And this year for Halloween, um, I wanted to, we were going to do kind of like a family costume, not necessarily family seeing as, you know, the adults weren't very invested in it, but, um, like my brother was going to be Wolverine and I was gonna try and like goes a different X-Men like Rogue, who is my second favorite Marvel character and my favorite X-Men. Um, but there weren't really any good costumes for her. And I looked for like other female Marvel characters and you know, even if I had gone Rogue is not very well known. Like even in the Marvel fandom, like a lot of people kind of forget about her, forget about a lot of the X-Men, but sure. But she's one of the less known X-Men, even though she was in the movies.
Alex:
9:59
So basically the female characters are not as recognizable. And there's the other problem that we talked about as well that a lot of the female characters and their costumes that are very highly sexualized. So for example, we've had lots of conversations at home about many of the Black Widow comics, they're going to be inappropriate because there's so much misogyny and the character is so highly and inappropriately sexualize too. Even though you were a big fan of that. Yeah.
Melissa:
10:27
And whenever we get to like my, when I was a little bit younger, my dad would have to like look through the Black Widow comic before we got it to like make sure that her like clothing was like appropriate. And like sometimes like it looked like a good comic and then like you don't like, and it'd be one where it was a collection of different artists and there'd be one that like she was overly sexualized, but the other ones looked really good. So when we would get it and we'd just be like, you know, like some of these look really cool but in order to read these cool ones we also have to like save these not as, yeah.
Alex:
11:02
Cool. On that way. What's it like for you as a girl? Like to have to navigate and a fan have to navigate all of that from a pretty young age so that misogyny, all that sexualization, of female superheroes that you love? It's something that boys generally don't have to do as much.
Melissa:
11:21
Yeah. Like you know, they all have giant breasts and like if they have a zipper in front of their suit, it will be down to their belly button just because you know that's the best way to fight crime. Obviously it seems very impractical, you know, or they like fight in heels and I'm, I've just always been like that that doesn't seem right to me. Like I, I don't, I can barely like walk in shoes that don't have heels sometimes. That's true. And I'm like, it's just,
Speaker 6:
12:00
yeah.
Melissa:
12:00
I wasn't introduced to Marvel until like 2012 when Avengers Age of Ultron came out. Cause I didn't read the comics as a kid because there weren't really any ones that like represented me that were age appropriate. So, you know, it wasn't ever anything that was going to be like super interesting for me, whereas I just read books because you know, the kid's books have women and there not like overly sexualized, but comics don't have that as much, but they're starting to now.
Alex:
12:36
And Yeah. So your first comics were definitely not Marvel comics. They were more more kind of, um, Akiko. One of your very first comics and then you started reading. So, absolutely. And um, um, so what do you think this means? Like Captain Marvel is different from all of that, right? Captain Marvel is not a character that is sexualized in the same way as Black Widow. And like you said, doesn't come in kind of, um, because she is somebody's mother, daughter, sister, wife, love interest, girlfriend, fiance,
Melissa:
13:14
Or employee. Black Widow came in as n employee. So did Pepper Potts.
Alex:
13:19
Oh. Or an employee, which works for a man, right.
Melissa:
13:22
For Tony Stark.
Alex:
13:24
Oh man, for Tony Stark who might just a tiny bit of a problem with misogyny maybe.
Melissa:
13:29
Not anymore as much in the movies.
Alex:
13:31
They've improved.
Melissa:
13:32
Tony Stark is, I really like him now, but I did not. [laughs]
Alex:
13:39
That's fair. Captain Marvel is different. And um, what do you think that having a movie like Captain Marvel means for girls who are younger than you, little girls?
Melissa:
13:49
It's important because they can see someone, they can actually go and see this movie. Whereas like, you know, with Black Widow in like Iron Man, it wasn't as bad as some of the comics, but like it wasn't really the kind of movie you take a little girl to go and see. Especially because the one before that is all about war. So it's kind of like,
Alex:
14:14
There's a lot of violence
Melissa:
14:16
a sequel as well and stuff. Whereas Captain Marvel like you could bring a little girl to go see that and it would be like appropriate for her. And like, um, even Kevin Feige he was talking about at one point, like they started the movie four years ago. So at this point his daughter has seen other movies, but he had mentioned that like, he had wanted this to be the first movie that like his daughter saw or something and that he was definitely going to bring her to see it because, you know, it was important to like for her to see that. And I'm just like, she's, she never wears heels, you know, she's like, she doesn't, she never wears heels. She like, she has a strong female mentor. She was a strong female, best friend. She has a strong female little girl that is just really cool. Yeah a niece basically. And um, you know, she's surrounded by strong women and she is a strong woman and she's age appropriate and like they didn't make the movie overly violent either. So even if she had not been over it, like even if she had been not overly sexualized but the movie had been violent than that, couldn't be like, that wouldn't have been as, that wouldn't have been as appropriate. But the movie is violent. I mean it is a Marvel movie but it's not like, like little girls can go see it and they can see themselves.
Alex:
15:53
And not to go all binary on you that I'm also wondering what it means for little boys to see a superhero who's like a protagonist that is, you know, all the things that you've described so well about Captain Marvel. What'd do you think it means to like little masculine people. Like your brother for example.
Melissa:
16:14
It shows that like the women and girls that they are surrounded with probably, unless they are very somewhere not on earth that like it shows that not only that like girls can be heroes too, but it shows that like, cause I mean it's a good movie. They'll probably like it. So it shows that they can enjoy a movie with a female character and they can possibly even like look up to these people and like, you know, it's not only shows that the people, like the girls around him can be strong, but it also shows them that they can admire and enjoy something that's not necessarily just representing them.
Alex:
17:02
Exactly. I mean in some ways that sounds like it broadens out more possibility for masculinity and femininity. Right. In, in general, kind of just, um, yeah, more ways to be, right. Yeah. [inaudible] when we went to see this movie, you were like, I know it's almost your birthday, but this is my movie. You said to me, this is my movie. Don't touch it. You can have Wonder Woman. She's more of your generation. This is kind of my movie. And this movie is incredibly important for you. And you talked about seeing yourself onscreen and then kind of cry before the movie came on,
Melissa:
17:41
I cried before there was anything on the screen even.
Alex:
17:43
And, and I think the only time I've ever seen you cry at a movie was during Avengers Infinity War.
Melissa:
17:50
I was sobbing.
Alex:
17:51
You were sobbing and that's unusual for you. And let's just say that is not a common occurrence. So what is it about representation that is so important in your view?
Melissa:
18:04
You know, like I said before, you know, I now have someone that I can just like, I could go dress up as and like be more recognized as in like, you know, with Black Widow and Scarlet Witch. They didn't, they were strong female characters, but they didn't really have their own backstory. Their backstory was that they came from a tragic place, you know, whereas Captain Marvel has her own backstory and she has her own person. And so, you know, seeing this whole person, I'm like, I can see like, oh, she had a best friend that she was close with. Like, Oh, I have a best friend as well that like I'm close with. And we laughed together and we like, um, talk about like sometimes like how some boys in like our school like mansplain to us and like they kind of talked about how like they were the only women on the Air Force. And I can kind of see that relationship between them and be like, you know, and they're, they also in the movie dealt with the misogyny that she faced as a little girl and as she grew up and I could, and I saw that and I was like, it's set in a different time, but it's also like, you know, I've seen those things happen and it's not as like, it's not to such extremes for me because my household isn't quite like that andwe don't live in the nineties anymore.
Alex:
19:28
I really hope your household is not like that. [both laugh] And you do not live in the nineties.
Melissa:
19:32
It's not like that.
Melissa:
19:36
but like, and I see her and I'm like, I've seen those struggles as well and I could, and I see you and you're like me and I can be a hero as well, like, and also your costume is really cool. And I want to wear that.
Alex:
19:52
Right. All the outfits are really pretty cool. Yes. Yes. So representation is really important and there are still way too many people who do not see themselves represented, um, on kind of the big screen. So, um, did the movie still have some things that could have been better? Maybe some problems around her presentation, do you think or
Melissa:
20:16
Yeah, it, um,
Alex:
20:18
Sorry, leading questions. I know we've talked about this so,
Melissa:
20:23
But, um, like you know, like it was a movie. It did have like her best friend who's a POC woman and her best friend's daughter who is a POC girl, but like it was a movie about Carol Danvers. So ultimately, who is, who is a CIS white woman. And there weren't, there weren't that many girls in it to be honest. Like there were more men than there were girls. But to be fair, a couple of them were pretty evil. Um, yeah. And they weren't the main characters. But like, there's so many other kinds of girls that like aren't represented in that movie. And like even, um, the black women were in the move, which they were in the movie, but like they weren't the main character and they were still like cool and like um strong but they weren't like saving the entire universe.
Alex:
21:36
Okay. I mean although her best friend saved like an oh spoilers. I mean
Melissa:
21:42
her best friend did like help save an entire species, did help save the universe but she wasn't the one. And you know, it'd be cool to see like a team movie of women, like you know, something a bit more like Black Panther where it was a movie for like all black people kind of like where it was about black people. Whereas Captain Marvel was about this woman and it represents women. But it wasn't about like these women are working together and are of different backgrounds and look different and it wasn't,
Alex:
22:23
wasn't as much about womanhood, but it meant a lot to women.
Melissa:
22:26
It meant a lot to women because it was representative but it didn't show like women working together. And like girl love as Lilly Singh would say.
Alex:
22:38
That's right, Lilly Singh who is another one of your heroes right, girl love. You would have liked to have seen some more girl love in the movie. That's, that's fair. So if you were like the queen of Marvel and you could decide what the next Marvel move is, apart from Avengers Endgame, which we know what's coming out, um, what do you think the next Marvel movie should be?
Melissa:
22:58
Well, I mean technically there's another Spiderman movie coming out.
Alex:
23:02
Sorry, apparently there's another Spiderman movie coming out. And again, just how uncool I am compared to my child is showing, but go on. Apart from a new Spiderman movie and Avengers Endgame. What do you think of the next Marvel movie should be?
Melissa:
23:15
I think there should be a woman movie, a women movie.
Alex:
23:22
Tell me about that.
Melissa:
23:24
Well, there's um, in the comics there is, I think there might be a couple of female teams, but I only really know of one at the moment, the Heralds, which I think they only made one graphic novel of, which is a very sad, but, um, something more like that. Where you see an all female team with people from all different like backgrounds and ethnicities, like you know, like Molly from Runaways can make it in, although she isn't part of the MCU. But yeah, like America Chavez and Kamala Khan and Danielle Moonstar who I did not know about until earlier, but she's a Native American woman and like X-23 who are all from like different backgrounds and they all look different. And just something to show like all little girls and all women that they can be represented and that they can work together to create a better world.
Alex:
24:26
So like these are representation of womanhood as we were saying, I mean, yes, there is so much work to do even at around increasing representation, not just the womanhood, but also like queerness and transness, nonbinaryness, um, difficult, different kinds of disabilities they have like.
Melissa:
24:43
Nico and Carolina and Nico is a Person of Color and they're both like they're queer and America Chavez is a Person of Color and queer.
Alex:
24:52
Yeah, there's so many possibilities and some of those are in the comic books to varying degrees, but they haven't really made it to the big screen.
Melissa:
25:01
Yeah. Or even like some of them are in TV shows, but like most of them haven't even made it to TV shows. Although with the Marvel Rising there were quite a few of them in that.
Alex:
25:12
That's true. So I love what you said about like an all women's team and I know that you have a great Pop! Collection. And can you explain to our listeners that don't know what Pop! is what a Pop is?
Melissa:
25:25
It's a Funko Pop! vinyl. They're little figurines with giant heads. Some are bobble heads, but not all of them, much to Ruby's disappointment.
Alex:
25:38
And you have your own kind of all women team of like Pop! Collection of superheroes.
Melissa:
25:44
They're not all superheroes.
Alex:
25:46
They're not all superheroes. But only female characters make it into your Pop! collection. Right. Can you tell me a bit why only female characters make into your Pop!collection?
Melissa:
25:56
Well, I mean, to be honest, the main reason is because you guys, my parents said that you didn't want me starting a really big collection.
Alex:
26:05
I mean, we didn't want you to get into figurines at all but that, you know, tragically happened.
Melissa:
26:10
So, um, because you know these everyone's going to be buying, you know, Tony Stark and you know, his 50 million different pops of him and it's like
Alex:
26:24
You're not bitter at all that there is like 50 million Pop!s of Tony Stark.
Melissa:
26:27
Oh No. Oh No. And then there's only five of Black Widow.
Alex:
26:32
You counted them.
Melissa:
26:32
I own all of them.
Alex:
26:34
That's true. How many of there of Captain Marvel?
Melissa:
26:37
Um, there are a lot now, but still probably not as many as Tony Stark, but he does have three movies and is in two other movies, you know, I guess.
Alex:
26:46
So you chose to only collect female characters?
Melissa:
26:50
Yes. And because they're like, they're strong and a lot of times stronger than the men even you know and like Tony Stark, not the most strong character I've seen. I mean more so now, at the beginning no.
Alex:
27:10
I mean Black Widow doesn't even have superpowers.
Melissa:
27:13
Debatable.
Alex:
27:14
Oh debatable?
Melissa:
27:14
Some people will tell you that she has, some people will tell you that she doesn't, depends comics, movies, it's, it's comics. Mama. They, they, they're not, continuity doesn't exist.
Alex:
27:27
I... Gender Stories listeners, I wish you could see the look of judgment and disappointment. The many looks of judgment and disappointment I've gotten from my child while taping this episode what I'm showing my ignorance compared to, to the depth of her fandom. So you are relating to girl power I guess is what I'm trying to say. Okay. Can you tell me why, why girl power so important to you and what does girl power mean to you?
Melissa:
27:53
Girl power is important to me because you know, I personally, I have a great family and so, you know, I've always been told I can like I can do anything regardless of, you know, my gender and um, but like you know, by like movies and like media, I've seen like, oh, you know, I must find true love to find meaning. And like I can't stand alone and be powerful. And I know that for me, you know, like it doesn't affect me that much because like my family, you know, tells me like, and has shown me a lot of like other medit'd ia where I am shown that, but there are a lot of little girls and women out there that don't know that, that haven't been shown that and they just see all the like, you know, you, you must be like attached to a man to do this. You should wear heels to fight crime because practicality. Um, and
Alex:
29:00
you should be a specific kind of girl,
Melissa:
29:02
a specific kind of girl. And it's important that that's not the message that everyone receives is important. It's that other messages get shown and it important because like, I even see it like more now that I have a little brother, I kind of see more of this like misogyny and stuff, which like I hadn't experienced firsthand so much before because I mean the only like man in my life was my father. Yes, I did. Now I have like a little brother who is you know, young and malleable and you know a lot of time like there are people who, there are a lot of men who are like opposed to Captain Marvel and there are people who actually, I read this in a post at one point. I don't know, I can't remember whose post it was so, but um, how like when people respond to those negative comments on like social media or stuff and then people are like, oh, but you won't change their minds. They're just stuck like that. It's not about changing their minds. It's about you know, those little girls who are out there who are seeing those negative comments. Then seeing the response and knowing that someone out there is standing up for them or someone is like, you know, that there is an alternative alternative and like there's someone standing up for them. It's not about changing other people's minds. It's not about, you know, the haters or whatever. Like, yeah, be cool to change their minds, but maybe some little girl will see that and they will see that someone is standing up for them and someone is telling them that they're important.
Alex:
31:05
Yeah. Wow, that's really great. I think I did an okay job there. I'm going to take some of the credit for you getting into girl power. I remember when you were little, and I also have to say for the sake of the listeners, we don't nonconsenually gender you, you strongly identified as a girl from a young age despite having a trans nonbinary parent and I know sometimes people think that kids can get confused about gender but they didn't seem at all confusing to you. You, you knew who you were and I remember kind of on the playground and you're like flopping into my arms and maybe four years old going, I'm a princess saved me and I'd be like, you're a princess with awesome powers. Save yourself. How are you going to save yourself? So kind of encouraging you to really think about your own strength rather than giving into the stereotypes. Even though we tried to protect you from are still out there. Right. So even though we tried to provide you a lot of strong role models, kind of even fiction, like you said, there are still a lot of problems even with the strong role models out there. Right.
Melissa:
32:07
I always, I always loved the idea of still being a princess but being able to save yourself like with the whole Princess Leia thing. Like I'm not a princess, I'm a general. I'm like why can't you be both? Like because being a princess, yes, it's something that you're like born into and being a general or something you earned, but Leia earned her title as a princess. She cared about her people and stuff. So I know this is a completely different fandom, but you know
Alex:
32:37
It's okay to go there.
Melissa:
32:41
With all the Disney princesses that like weren't strong but like you could still be feminine and girly and a princess and like still be strong. Like with Captain Marvel now in the comic books she has short hair but like in the movie she has like long hair and she like is feminine. She's not overly feminine because you know it's important as the first like main female character. We don't want to like have that overly done but like she's still feminine and strong. She doesn't have to be one or the other
Alex:
33:22
You can be a princess and a general. Yeah, I love that. So I've been talking about this for a long time but I also know that I promised you both of the November episodes. I actually, I promised you I'm going to just come, I'm going to be honest to my listeners, I promised you an episode in November of 2018 and then I kind of failed you cause that that month went and we didn't tape an episode. So this year to make it up to you in 2019 you're going to have both of the November episodes. We're going to talk more about, who knows. I'll let you know when we decide what we're doing for November. But for now, for this episode, is there anything I haven't asked you about that you wanted to say about Captain Marvel? Any he kind of last thoughts and especially about Captain Marvel and gender or fandom and gender?
Melissa:
34:11
Well the new Marvel Rising? People should watch that. I know it's a kid show. You should still watch it because it's important. It's got like POC and female characters and um, Captain Marvel, go watch it. It's important.
Alex:
34:33
Go watch it maybe even more than once. You think you're going to watch it more than once?
Melissa:
34:36
I'm gonna watch it as many times as I can and you know, like it is, I can say this with certainty. Don't question me on this enough people have that. It is the best movie I have ever seen. And you know, the plot was cool. It was pretty great actually, but that's not why. It's because, you know, that was me on that screen and that was me not having to do anything to be awesome, you know, not having to like fall in love, not having to do something.
Alex:
35:16
Not having to be somebody's kid.
Melissa:
35:16
I just, you know, saw this awesome woman being herself and being strong and that's so important.
Alex:
35:29
It is so important. I think I put it in one of my Twitter's like the joy that I saw in you as a cis white girl, seeing yourself represented on that screen. That's the joy I want for every child out there and that's why representation matters and that's why representation is incredibly important. Right. So I am really looking forward to interviewing again in November. I guess we'll probably talk about fandom more and um, yeah. Is there anything else that you want to say to the wonderful Gender Stories listeners for today or is that a good place to leave it at?
Melissa:
36:08
Go read America Chavez as well and Riri Williams, I could go on forever, but
Alex:
36:13
No, give more recommendations, go for it. Give all the recommendations.
Melissa:
36:16
Kamala Khan, Riri Williams, America Chavez, um, go watch Marvel's Runaways, The Gifted. All of these have really great representation and you know, and a lot of the comics I mentioned like Kamala Khan and stuff are pretty kid friendly as well. So
Alex:
36:43
Thank you for the recommendations and Oh and if you are looking for a more social justice focused convention, where do we go every May?
Melissa:
36:51
WisCon.
Alex:
36:52
And what do we think about WisCon?
Melissa:
36:54
It's really cool.
Alex:
36:55
What do you love about WisCon?
Melissa:
36:56
Um, we get to go see people talk about what they're passionate about in relation to social justice and fandom. And you know, there's a cool dance.
Alex:
37:11
There's a cool dance.
Melissa:
37:11
And there's a lot of video edits, which are really cool.
Alex:
37:15
And you love the vid edits. That's real.
Melissa:
37:19
Did you just call them vid edits?
Alex:
37:21
I did, what should I have called them?
Melissa:
37:24
It's just kind of sounded weird, but okay.
Alex:
37:26
Okay. I definitely feel I'm not cool enough for my child, so I should definitely end this interview before I show myself as being very not cool.
Melissa:
37:37
Oh and Kate Bishop from Hawkeye. I'm sorry, I forgot her.
Alex:
37:42
No, go ahead, add it.
Melissa:
37:42
Okay. Kate Bishop, the new Hawkeye.
Alex:
37:46
Kate Bishop. So there you have it Gender Stories listeners, you have some wonderful recommendation for reading, TV shows, and a movie to go watch Captain Marvel. In the meantime, stay awesome and embrace your own superpowers. And I will see you next episode. And if you want to find out more about Gender Stories, please follow me on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook. You can just find us under Gender Stories. And did you know that you can support Gender Stories on Patreon? You can just go to patreon.com/genderstories and if you want to find out more about gender, yes, you know it. It's the point where I plug my book."How to Understand Your Gender: A Practical Guide for Exploring Who You Are". Coauthored with Meg-John Barker. And I have a new book coming out to May, 2019 "Life Isn't Binary". Um, thank you for listening, until next time.
Melissa:
38:39
Read!